Sherry Turkle
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Sherry Turkle is one of the folk who began exploring ideas and issues in relation to using things digital. She has developed a strong line about the damage digital technologies are doing to human relationships. A review of her recent book captures her position well.

Here is a selection of her publications

Turkle, S. (1984). The Second Self. Computers and the Human Spirit. New York: Simon and Schuster.
Turkle, S. (1995). Life on the Screen. Identity in the Age of the Internet. New York: Simon and Schuster.
Turkle, S. (1997). Seeing through computers: education in a culture of simulation. The American Prospect(31 (March-April)), 76-82.
Turkle, S. (2003). From Powerful Ideas to PowerPoint. Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies, 9(2), 19-25. doi: 10.1177/135485650300900204
Turkle, S. (2007). Evocative objects : things we think with. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
Turkle, S. (2008). The inner history of devices. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
Turkle, S. (2009). Simulation and its discontents. Cambridge, Mass.: The MIT Press.
Turkle, S. (2011). Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other. New York: Basic Books.
Turkle, S. (2015). Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age (epub ed.). New York: Penguin Press.
Turkle, S., & Papert, S. (1990). Epistemological Pluralism: Styles and Voices within the Computer Culture. Signs, 16(1), 128-157.
Turkle, S., & Papert, S. (1992). Epistemological Pluralism and the Revaluation of the Concrete. Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 11, 3-33.